Sustainable business courses

 

SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS FOUNDATIONS – ECON 3430 / MGBU 3430
Available in the fall 2013 semester
This interdisciplinary foundation course for the new sustainable business minor covers the economic and management principles necessary to create and manage businesses that operate on the “triple bottom line”: people, planet and profit. This course asks: How can businesses remain viable for the long term while also helping to reduce social injustice, global poverty and environmental degradation? Students will explore the challenges of running such a business today, critique that approach in contrast with traditional business, and eventually develop a proposal for a sustainable venture. Expert guest speakers and detailed case studies give students deeper insight into the problems and opportunities of sustainable management.

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: AN INTRODUCTION – 20637 – MGBU 3446 – R01
Available in the spring 2013 semester
This course explores how to create social value through the principles of entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurship is a rapidly developing movement that is blurring the boundaries between government, business and the NGO sector. Social entrepreneurs look for what is not working in society — problems related to poverty, health and climate change, for example — and launch business designed to contribute to a solution. Their work can change the system by persuading societies to move beyond traditional patterns of thinking. This class studies examples of successful social entrepreneurs, such as 2006 Nobel laureate Mohammad Yunus; analyzes factors that promote positive social change; and culminates in the chance to write a plan for a socially entrepreneurial endeavor.

SUSTAINABILITY AND FINANCE
Available in the fall 2013 semester
As companies adopt sustainability as a value and a business strategy, finance practitioners are evaluating how their work can advance that mission. How is sustainability changing the way companies conceive of and apply financial tools and techniques? This course examines how financial practice can either support or undermine global sustainability. Using examples of leading and creative financial practitioners, it will explore, among other topics, how companies are using data to measure sustainability impacts; how managers are creating financial value by pursuing sustainability; how the investment and lending community is learning to assess companies according to new sustainability criteria; and how the existing financial paradigm of shareholder wealth maximization (SWM) might further evolve to more explicitly incorporate the goals of global sustainability.

FAIR TRADE AND MICROFINANCE – 20528 – CPBU 4001 – E01
Available in the spring 2013 semester
This course blends academic learning with Fair Trade’s capacity to take action against economic injustice in solidarity with the poor. Students in this course run an actual Fair Trade business, Amani, from the Rose Hill campus. They and the instructor will work in partnership with a team of business school students in India to locate new Fair Trade businesses in that country, and will travel to visit those businesses during spring break.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP & FAIR TRADE – 20529 – CPBU 4004 – E01
Available in the spring 2013 semester
This course focuses on the entrepreneurial response to economic injustice, as expressed in the Fair Trade movement. It will explore the category of businesses that are founded by entrepreneurs to alleviate poverty, focusing on enteprises in India that might pursue Fair Trade certification. Students will take the course in parallel with a group of business school students in India, sharing a common syllabus of readings. Course participants will travel to India during spring break to meet with their Indian peers and visit businesses.

SPIRITUALITY, FAIR TRADE & SOCIAL JUSTICE
To be offered in future semesters
This course is designed to ignite a spiritual awareness of economic injustice, which ultimately motivates action, large or small. It explores the mechanisms of poverty, looks at alternative forms of commerce and considers why Fair Trade is able to answer some of the human rights issues associated with poverty. Readings highlight spiritual leaders and the models for action that their life stories provide. How should business students evaluate their lives and their careers? What might “solidarity with the poor” mean in a variety of contexts? The course includes a visit to important spiritual locations in India.